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They Just Don't Get It

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  • They Just Don't Get It

    I am still working out the details on my spring challenge and was blown away by the conversation I had last night. I have planned two twists for this challenge. One is that I am only taking a knife with me. The other one is that it will be a dual challenge. I will be taking a rookie with me to teach them how it works. He will be able to bring more gear and will be in a separate camp from me. We discussed what gear he wanted to bring. I also asked him to read up on symptoms and treatment of hypothermia, dehydration, and open wounds. In addition, I asked him to read up on how to tell the difference between a venomous and non-venomous snake. I felt these would be the largest health concerns considering the circumstances.

    This is where the conversation started to surprise me. We have been planning this since my last challenge which I believe was in January. So at this point he starts acting surprised that he needs to know these things. We have known each other for over a decade, but I guess he assumed that surviving in the wild was not actually going to risk his safety. Sure I will be close by to help out if he needs it and I have several safety precautions in place, but things can still go wrong.

    So just when I feel like it is starting to sink in, he asks if he can bring his 12 year old son along for the ride. He still didn't understand the risk. I was able to convince him to leave his son at home for this one, but man it was surprising. I mean do people really think this stuff is that easy? I'm sure they watch it on television and don't comprehend the entertainment aspect of it. It just scares me to think how many people would be overconfident in a survival situation. How many people would die because they think they can just do what they see on television. What are your thoughts?

  • #2
    Excellent point. Injury and even death are both more than possible in an SHTF scenario. In fact, I think even something as simple as a cold can severely hinder a bug out.

    I was supposed to go on a hike 2 months ago and got sick the morning I was about to leave. The others went and it was really, really cold, something like 0F - 5F. If I had gone or of some emergency had occurred that day, I don't think I would've made it very far given the state I was in (I could barely get out of bed).
    Always stay safe,

    Dan

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    • #3
      I have completed a few survival challenges while sick and it is twice as hard. I've done it with a sinus infection and with bronchitis. You just have so much less energy and the hunger and thirst hit that much faster. We have tentatively moved up the date for our challenge to 3/31 so I hope he will be ready. I agreed to take him and his son on a separate backpacking trip where we will stick to the trail and have more gear with us. I am hoping I can teach his son some survival techniques and give him a fun experience without putting his safety at risk. Then he can do a real challenge with some knowledge if he wants.

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      • #4
        Sounds good! Have you thought about what you're going to teach him?
        Always stay safe,

        Dan

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        • #5
          I discussed the plan with his dad. While Arden, the son, will have a sleeping bag, and emergency blanket, and some other gear, Justin and I are going to rough it. Arden will be able to watch us start a primitive fire, filter water, build a primitive shelter, and hunt and gather food. However, he will have enough gear that he can be relatively safe and comfortable while watching us do things the hard way. I figure the first day and night of hiking he will stay comfortable and then maybe the remaining days and nights he might want to challenge himself a bit more.

          I'm going to let him bring whatever water or food he wants to carry, and despite me bringing no food I will likely let Justin bring hardtack or jerky if he wants. Justin will have a pack and some gear, but I will probably leave the pack at home and just bring what I can carry in my pockets: a knife, a small saw, a water filter, my pocket fisherman, a small flashlight, some paracord, a compass, a ferro rod, and fire cubes. We will have three different skill levels displayed so we will all be learning at all times.

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